POLICE RADAR AND LASER

Georgia Speeding Ticket

When it comes to radar and laser detection, as well as ways you might evade such detection and a Georgia speeding ticket, there are some important facts to get straight.

 

Even before the officer shoots his laser or radar gun at your vehicle, he must make a visual estimation of speed. In order to receive certification in speed detection, officers have to be certified to visually estimate the speed of your vehicle within plus or minus 5 mph. This is known as the “tracking history.” This visual estimation is enough evidence on its own to convict you of speeding—no further laser confirmation necessary.

 

Now let’s talk briefly about the difference between radar and laser guns.

 

Radar emits a very long and wide cone of signal. It picks up the most ‘reflective’ vehicle—determined by the car’s size, color, cleanliness, amount of chrome, etc. So it’s often difficult to get a good read on smaller cars or motorcycles in the presence of more ‘reflective’ vehicles.

 

Laser guns, on the other hand, are known as “lane specific,” and are accurate at any distance. This means the officer can pick which car he wants to shoot—there are no mix-ups. Laser guns are accurate at any distance. But remember, the officer has to have a “tracking history” on you first, and an officer can’t get that from more than about 2000 feet away.

 

As for evasion methods, the answer is simple: radar and laser detectors don’t work. Old radar guns had a ‘lock’ feature to emit a constant signal. But modern radar guns require the officer to shoot the device—meaning there’s no radar to be detected until it’s too late.  The same is true with laser.

 

Jammers, scramblers, absorbers, and devices that make your “invisible” to radar or laser don’t work either. Remember, by the time you see the officer’s police vehicle and you hit the brakes to slow down, he’s almost always already clocked your speed.

If you’ve received a Georgia speeding ticket the goal is to get the ticket dismissed, or reduced, so the charge will not go on your driving history and affect your insurance rates and/or job. If you’ve received a Georgia speeding ticket contact us today. 404-467-1747.

Visual Estimates

Even before the officer shoots his laser or radar gun at your vehicle, he must make a visual estimation of speed. In order to receive certification in speed detection, officers have to be certified to visually estimate the speed of your vehicle within plus or minus 5 mph. This is known as the “tracking history" and is enough to convict you.

Radar

Officer’s either use a radar or a laser gun to detect speed. Radar emits a very long and wide cone of radar. It picks up the most ‘reflective’ vehicle—determined by the car’s size, color, cleanliness, amount of chrome, etc. So it’s often difficult to get a good read on smaller cars or motorcycles in the presence of more ‘reflective’ vehicles.

Lasers

Laser guns, on the other hand, are known as “lane specific,” and are accurate at any distance. This means the officer can pick which car he wants to shoot—there are no mix-ups. But remember, the officer has to have a “tracking history” on you first, and an officer can’t get that from more than about 2000 feet away.

Detectors Do Not Work!

As for evasion methods, the answer is simple: radar and laser detectors don’t work. Old radar guns had a ‘lock’ feature to emit a constant signal. But modern radar guns require the officer to shoot the device—meaning there’s no radar to be detected until it’s too late. The same is true with laser.

Jammers, Scramblers, Absorbers...

Jammers, scramblers, absorbers, and devices that make your “invisible” to radar or laser don’t work either. Remember, by the time you see the officer’s police vehicle and you hit the brakes to slow down, he’s almost always already clocked your speed.

Fighting a DUI case? We Can Help!